American Immigration: The Next Wave?

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As long as we can remember people have been saying that America
is a nation of immigrants. This is certainly a true statement. But they
haven’t all come from the same place. In the 19th century we saw a
massive German wave of immigration come to our shores. Then
from about 1890 to the 1920s the more typical northern European
immigrants were accompanied by never-before-seen flow of
newcomers from Southern and Eastern Europe. In 1965 after a
40 year long drastic reduction in all immigration we the start
of a unprecedented 50 year long flow of newcomers from Latin America
as well as Asia. One thing is certain: the history of U.S. Immigration
is varied and unpredictable.American Immigration

However there is one trend in immigration that appears certain:
the sunset of mass Latin American Immigration in the next
couple of decades. Latin American demographics clearly back
up this assertion. According to the Economic Commission for
Latin American and the Caribbean, a majority of nations in
Latin America have seen the birth rates go down by 60 percent
65 years. This development has been accompanied by
rising living standards among Latin Americans in recent
years. According to the World Bank, remittances,the
money immigrants sent home to relatives still living in Latin America,
came to 50 billion from 2000 to 2013. So if we put these
three facts together we notice that millions of Latin Americans left
their home therefore leaving this region with
fewer people who received billions of dollars
from those living in the U.S. Receiving this massive
influx of wealth raised their standard of living therefore
giving them less inclination to resettle
in the U.S. for a better life.

The next issue that demands our attention is who’s
next? Which part of the world will send its masses to
our shores to try and gain the American dream? The
most logical choice would be the Indian Subcontinent.
Why this part of the world? First, look at the population,
this subcontinent holds nearly a billion and a half people.
Second,this region has a high birth rate. According to
World Bank research this region’s birth rate hovers
around three children per woman. Furthermore
the Indian Subcontinent has more people overall
with nearly one and a half billion to Latin America’s
roughly 200 million. A fourth reason is that the entire
Indian subcontinent had only one nation as it s
colonial ruler,Great Britain. Great Britain is a
relatively small island nation so there is only so much
room. America is attractive to Indians since it
has not only a liberal immigration policy but also
a language,English that Indians are fluent or at
very least familiar due to their British colonial
past. Finally much of India’s educational system
in recent years has produced a good number of high
tech workers, a field that the U.S.A. is looking to
increase in order to keep competitive in the world
economy.

Other regions of the world are considerably less likely
to engender mass migration to American shores.
First, Sub Saharan Africa has the massive population
that is perfect for resettlement to the U.S.A. However this
region had no fewer than 8 European rulers during the
colonial period. This is an important point to consider
since immigrants ironically due prefer to resettle in the nation
that was once their colonial ruler. So with all of these European
nations and South Africa,the continent’s strongest economy,
siphoning off the so many people,Africa seems a less likely
candidate to be sending its masses to America. Neither does
Europe or the Pacific Asian Rim seem to be likely contributors
in this regard since according to the World Bank both of these regions
have low birth rates and standards of living that are developed or are
quickly developing to first world standards (Poland and the Phillipines
for example).

Finall,y the Middle East/North African region of our
planet is the least likely to produce a mass migration to
the U.S. despite its fertile population. This is because of any
region on the earth it is the most antagonistic and anti-american
in its attitudes. This obviously impedes immigration to our fine
shores. Equally important is the fact that the typical arab who
wishes to leave the region for a better life has a more attractive
options that the U.S.A. The options would be entering one of the
wealthly Gulf States such as Kuwaitt, U.A.E. and Saudi Arabia. If an Arab
immigrant starts a new life in one of these nations it is a better deal
than in the U.S.A. in so many ways. First the arab doesn’t have the
overwhelming stress of adapting to a alien language and culture which
the American immigration experience demands. These arabs in the Gulf
Nations can easily blend in to the familiar Arabic way of life in these
countries while getting more government benefits such as free health
care and free higher education that are not found in the United States.
When you also figure that Australia and Europe are closer to the Arab
World than the U.S. one realizes that America is definitely not a top
choice for resettlement for the typical arab.

With all these considerations we see that the Indian subcontinent
stands out as the clear candidate for the next chapter in America’s
important immigrant history.

American Immigration: The Next Wave?

As long as we can remember people have been saying that America
is a nation of immigrants. This is certainly a true statement. But they
haven’t all come from the same place. In the 19th century we saw a
massive German wave of immigration come to our shores. Then
from about 1890 to the 1920s the more typical northern European
immigrants were accompanied by never-before-seen flow of
newcomers from Southern and Eastern Europe. In 1965 after a
40 year long drastic reduction in all immigration we the start
of a unprecedented 50 year long flow of newcomers from Latin America
as well as Asia. One thing is certain: the history of U.S. Immigration
is varied and unpredictable.

However there is one trend in immigration that appears certain:
the sunset of mass Latin American Immigration in the next
couple of decades. Latin American demographics clearly back
up this assertion. According to the Economic Commission for
Latin American and the Caribbean, a majority of nations in
Latin America have seen the birth rates go down by 60 percent
65 years. This development has been accompanied by
rising living standards among Latin Americans in recent
years. According to the World Bank, remittances,the
money immigrants sent home to relatives still living in Latin America,
came to 50 billion from 2000 to 2013. So if we put these
three facts together we notice that millions of Latin Americans left
their home therefore leaving this region with
fewer people who received billions of dollars
from those living in the U.S. Receiving this massive
influx of wealth raised their standard of living therefore
giving them less inclination to resettle
in the U.S. for a better life.

The next issue that demands our attention is who’s
next? Which part of the world will send its masses to
our shores to try and gain the American dream? The
most logical choice would be the Indian Subcontinent.
Why this part of the world? First, look at the population,
this subcontinent holds nearly a billion and a half people.
Second,this region has a high birth rate. According to
World Bank research this region’s birth rate hovers
around three children per woman. Furthermore
the Indian Subcontinent has more people overall
with nearly one and a half billion to Latin America’s
roughly 200 million. A fourth reason is that the entire
Indian subcontinent had only one nation as it s
colonial ruler,Great Britain. Great Britain is a
relatively small island nation so there is only so much
room. America is attractive to Indians since it
has not only a liberal immigration policy but also
a language,English that Indians are fluent or at
very least familiar due to their British colonial
past. Finally much of India’s educational system
in recent years has produced a good number of high
tech workers, a field that the U.S.A. is looking to
increase in order to keep competitive in the world
economy.

Other regions of the world are considerably less likely
to engender mass migration to American shores.
First, Sub Saharan Africa has the massive population
that is perfect for resettlement to the U.S.A. However this
region had no fewer than 8 European rulers during the
colonial period. This is an important point to consider
since immigrants ironically due prefer to resettle in the nation
that was once their colonial ruler. So with all of these European
nations and South Africa,the continent’s strongest economy,
siphoning off the so many people,Africa seems a less likely
candidate to be sending its masses to America. Neither does
Europe or the Pacific Asian Rim seem to be likely contributors
in this regard since according to the World Bank both of these regions
have low birth rates and standards of living that are developed or are
quickly developing to first world standards (Poland and the Phillipines
for example).

Finall,y the Middle East/North African region of our
planet is the least likely to produce a mass migration to
the U.S. despite its fertile population. This is because of any
region on the earth it is the most antagonistic and anti-american
in its attitudes. This obviously impedes immigration to our fine
shores. Equally important is the fact that the typical arab who
wishes to leave the region for a better life has a more attractive
options that the U.S.A. The options would be entering one of the
Wealthy Gulf States such as Kuwaitt, U.A.E. and Saudi Arabia. If an Arab
immigrant starts a new life in one of these nations it is a better deal
than in the U.S.A. in so many ways. First the arab doesn’t have the
overwhelming stress of adapting to a alien language and culture which
the American immigration experience demands. These arabs in the Gulf
Nations can easily blend in to the familiar Arabic way of life in these
countries while getting more government benefits such as free health
care and free higher education that are not found in the United States.
When you also figure that Australia and Europe are closer to the Arab
World than the U.S. one realizes that America is definitely not a top
choice for resettlement for the typical arab.

With all these considerations we see that the Indian subcontinent
stands out as the clear candidate for the next chapter in America’s
important immigrant history.

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