The Ultimate Guide To Installing Shelving Brackets On Various Surfaces

The Ultimate Guide To Installing Shelving Brackets On Various Surfaces

Shelving brackets are a smart and useful way to hang, support, and protect your belongings. Installing them can be a little bit tricky because you’ll need the right tools and materials and it’s worth taking time to get it right!

Here we walk you through three common install types: drywall, plaster, lath, and masonry. If you have a different type of surface where you need to install your brackets, just follow the same principles as these examples – it’s pretty easy!

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1. Drywall aka sheetrock

Tools required: electric drill, driving bit (usually either 10-32 or 1/4″), and a screwdriver

Materials required: shelving brackets, screws, drywall anchors (if necessary), and a pencil

Determine where you want to place your brackets. Draw a level line from floor to ceiling on the wall with a pencil. If marking from the ceiling or floor is difficult, use painter’s tape or masking tape to make a reference line.

Place the bracket against the wall where you want it to be mounted, lining up the bottom edge of the bracket with your level line. Mark two screw holes onto the wall through each predrilled hole in the back of the bracket with a pencil. When marking, take care to follow instructions for proper placement of the screws.

Using a drill and driving bit, pre-drill holes for each of your marked screw locations at least two inches deep inside the wall cavity (away from any wires or studs). You want to make sure that you go deep enough so you don’t hit anything when you attach the wall shelf brackets, but not so deep that you go through the wall.

Attach your bracket to the wall using flathead screws (not included) by turning them with a screwdriver. Keep in mind that the longer the screw, the stronger it will be, but more likely to cause damage on install. Try to keep these fasteners no longer than 1 1/4″. Also, do not over-tighten the screws as it can lead to cracking of the bracket. If you do happen to crack your new bracket (or any other damage occurs), stop and contact an expert ASAP!

2. Plaster aka lathe and lath

Tools required: electric drill, masonry bit (usually either 13/32″ or 3/8″), lag shield anchor (if necessary), and a screwdriver

Materials required: shelving brackets, screws, washers (if necessary), masonry anchors (if necessary), paint if desired

Determine where you want to place your bracket. For this example we will be attaching the bracket onto wood lath; however, this process is the same for attaching onto plaster/lath.

Place your bracket against the wall where you want it to be mounted, lining up the bottom edge of the bracket with your level line. If marking from the floor or ceiling is difficult, use painter’s tape or masking tape to make a reference line. Mark two screw holes through each predrilled hole in the back of the bracket with a pencil.

Using a masonry bit enlarges holes for each of your marked screw locations about an inch deep inside the wall cavity (away from any wires or studs). You want to make sure that you go deep enough so you don’t hit anything when you attach the bracket, but not so deep that you go through the wall.

Attach your bracket to the wall using a lag shield anchor (included) by screwing them in with a screwdriver. If you happen to hit any obstructions while inserting the screws into the anchor, back it out and re-insert until properly installed . No need to over-tighten the screws.

3. Lath

Tools required: electric drill, masonry bit (usually either 13/32″ or 3/8″), lag shield anchor (if necessary), and a screwdriver

Materials required: shelving brackets, screws, washers (if necessary), masonry anchors (if necessary), paint if desired

Determine where you want to place your bracket. Mark two screw holes through each predrilled hole in the back of the bracket with a pencil.

Using a masonry bit, enlarge holes for each of your marked screw locations about an inch deep inside the wall cavity (away from any wires or studs). You want to make sure that you go deep enough so you don’t hit anything when you attach the bracket, but not so deep that you go through the wall.

Attach your bracket to the wall using a lag shield anchor (included) by screwing them in with a screwdriver. If you happen to hit any obstructions while inserting the screws into the anchor, back it out and re-insert until properly installed. No need to over-tighten the screws.

4. Masonry (brick or stone)

Tools required: electric drill, masonry bit (usually either 13/32″ or 3/8″), lag shield anchor (if necessary), and a screwdriver

Materials required: shelving brackets, screws, washers (if necessary), masonry anchors (if necessary), paint if desired

Determine where you want to place your bracket. Mark two screw holes through each predrilled hole in the back of the bracket with a pencil. If marking from the floor or ceiling is difficult, use painter’s tape or masking tape to make a reference line.

Using a masonry bit, enlarge holes for each of your marked screw locations about an inch deep inside the wall cavity (away from any wires or studs). You want to make sure that you go deep enough so you don’t hit anything when you attach the bracket, but not so deep that you go through the wall.

Attach your bracket to the wall  using a lag shield anchor (included) by screwing them in with a screwdriver. If you happen to hit any obstructions while inserting the screws into the anchor, back it out and re-insert until properly installed. No need to over-tighten the screws.

Once you have your brackets installed, use a stud finder to mark where your shelves will go. If you are placing heavy objects on the shelf, drill into typical stud locations so that they can hold more weight. Then, once everything is set up and in place, enjoy the trashy goodness of having more space for all of those extra goodies!

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